corona virus cell

covid-19

A novel coronavirus called COVID-19 has been detected in millions of people worldwide. Cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in New York State, including Westchester County, and it is expected that more cases of COVID-19 will be identified in the future. For a current COVID-19 case count in New York State with a breakdown by county, visit the NYSDOH COVID-19 Tracker. Information and guidance about COVID-19 for health care providers can be found on our Physician's Corner.

If you need to know whether you should quarantine or self-isolate, use our Quarantine or Self-Isolate tool. This tool will ask a series of questions to help determine whether you are subject to an Order of Isolation, an Order of Quarantine, or if it is recommended that you Self-Quarantine. Guidance will be given based on your answers.

Pediatric Multi-System Inflammatory Syndrome Associated with COVID-19
The Westchester County Department of Health is alerting parents and guardians that there has been a rare, but serious, childhood inflammatory disease reported among children and teens (En español) with a possible link to COVID-19. The New York State Department of Health is investigating several cases of severe illness in children and child deaths that may be related to COVID-19 where children are experiencing symptoms similar to Kawasaki disease and toxic shock-like syndrome.

sleeping baby

sleeping baby on back
October is SIDS Awareness Month. Parents and caregivers can rest easy knowing the steps to lower a baby’s risk for SIDS and suffocation. It's as simple as ABC. 

The ABCs of Safe Sleep, as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and others, are a reminder that the safest way for babies to sleep is Alone, on their Backs, and in a Crib. Every night. Every nap.


Create a Safe Sleep Environment for your baby


"A" is for Alone:

  • Always let baby sleep alone in a crib, never in a bed with another person or pet where baby could be smothered.
  • Only have a firm mattress and tight-fitting sheet in the crib.
  • No blankets, pillows, bumpers or toys.
  • Dress baby in one more layer of clothing than you.

"B" is for on baby's Back: Always let baby sleep alone in a crib with only a firm mattress, tight-fitting sheet and no blankets, pillow, bumpers or toys.

  • Always place baby to sleep on his or her back.
  • No sleeping on tummy or sides.
  • Tummy time is for supervised play time.
  • No pillows or wedges in crib.

"C" is for Crib:

  • Baby should sleep in a safe and separate crib or bassinet.
  • Use a tight-fitted sheet with no blankets.
  • Never allow baby to sleep on a couch.
  • No futons, chairs, waterbeds or dresser drawers.

 

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four individuals

The Dr. Harold Keltz Distinguished Public Health Service Award is presented annually to a person or community-based organization, whose efforts have made an extraordinary contribution to the public health of Westchester residents but who is not professionally engaged in public health work.

The J.R. Tesone Youth Public Health Award is an annual award to a student up to age 21 for his or her creative contribution to public health in Westchester. The award was created in 2014 in memory of J.R. Tesone, a Board of Health member with a lifelong commitment to Westchester children.

“Talented and selfless people work hard every day to make our communities healthier,” said Robert Baker, MD, president of the Westchester County Board of Health. “By nominating these volunteers for recognition, you can help inspire others to join our efforts to promote and protect public health in Westchester.”

The Board also will highlight the compassion, creativity and commitment demonstrated by a select group of nominees who will be named Public Health Honorees.

These awards will be announced and presented in April to spotlight National Public Health Week, and the honorees and their achievements will be featured on the health department’s web pages. Recent youthful winners have promoted youth awareness of the dangers of vaping, advocated for restrictions on tobacco sales, promoted awareness of the opioid crisis on campus or increased sustainability and Earth Day programming, advocated for children affected by cancer or created an app to foster communication betweenteens with Type 1 diabetes. Adult volunteers were recognized recently for promoting awareness of mental health and addiction among young people, promoting the construction and preservation of affordable housing and advocating for comprehensive mental health care for low-income residents. Non-profit programs also have been selected for their work to reduce health disparities, improve health literacy, and improve access to care.